Prevention
  • Good Diet = Healthy Teeth

    Healthy eating habits lead to healthy teeth. Like the rest of the body, the teeth, bones and the soft tissues of the mouth need a well-balanced diet. Children should eat a variety of foods from the five major food groups. Most snacks that children eat can lead to cavity formation. The more frequently a child snacks, the greater the chance for tooth decay. How long food remains in the mouth also plays a role. For example, hard candy and breath mints stay in the mouth a long time, which cause longer acid attacks on tooth enamel. If your child must snack, choose nutritious foods such as vegetables, low-fat yogurt, and low-fat cheese which are healthier and better for children’s teeth.

  • Care of Your Child’s Teeth

    Begin daily brushing as soon as the child’s first tooth erupts. A pea size amount of fluoride toothpaste can be used after the child is old enough not to swallow it. By age 4 or 5, children should be able to brush their own teeth twice a day with supervision until about age seven to make sure they are doing a thorough job. However, each child is different. Your dentist can help you determine whether the child has the skill level to brush properly.

     

    Proper brushing removes plaque from the inner, outer and chewing surfaces. When teaching children to brush, place toothbrush at a 45 degree angle; start along gum line with a soft bristle brush in a gentle circular motion. Brush the outer surfaces of each tooth, upper and lower. Repeat the same method on the inside surfaces and chewing surfaces of all the teeth. Finish by brushing the tongue to help freshen breath and remove bacteria.

     

    Flossing removes plaque between the teeth where a toothbrush can’t reach. Flossing should begin when any two teeth touch. You should floss the child’s teeth until he or she can do it alone. Use about 18 inches of floss, winding most of it around the middle fingers of both hands. Hold the floss lightly between the thumbs and forefingers. Use a gentle, back-and-forth motion to guide the floss between the teeth. Curve the floss into a C-shape and slide it into the space between the gum and tooth until you feel resistance. Gently scrape the floss against the side of the tooth. Repeat this procedure on each tooth. Don’t forget the backs of the last four teeth.

  • How Do I Prevent Cavities?

    Good oral hygiene removes bacteria and the leftover food particles that combine to create cavities. For infants, use a wet gauze or clean washcloth to wipe the plaque from teeth and gums. Avoid putting your child to bed with a bottle filled with anything other than water. See "Baby Bottle Tooth Decay" for more information.

     

    For older children, brush their teeth at least twice a day. Also, watch the number of snacks containing sugar that you give your children.

     

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends six month visits to the pediatric dentist beginning at your child’s first birthday. Routine visits will start your child on a lifetime of good dental health.

     

    Your pediatric dentist may also recommend protective sealants or home fluoride treatments for your child. Sealants can be applied to your child’s molars to prevent decay on hard to clean surfaces.

  • Seal Out Decay

    A sealant is a clear or shaded plastic material that is applied to the chewing surfaces (grooves) of the back teeth (premolars and molars), where four out of five cavities in children are found. This sealant acts as a barrier to food, plaque, and acid, thus protecting the decay-prone areas of the teeth.

    before sealant:

    after sealant:

  • Fluoride

    Fluoride is an element, which has been shown to be beneficial to teeth. However, too little or too much fluoride can be detrimental to the teeth. Little or no fluoride will not strengthen the teeth to help them resist cavities. Excessive fluoride ingestion by preschool-aged children can lead to dental fluorosis, which is a chalky white or brown discoloration, or pitting of the permanent teeth. Many children often get more fluoride than their parents realize.

     

    The benefits of fluoride are not obtained through ingestion.  Fluoride's main beneficial effect is through topical application on the teeth.  When acid attacks teeth it removes calcium from the teeth which weakens the tooth and eventually becomes a cavity.  Fluoride, when applied topically to the teeth, can replace lost calcium and actually make the tooth stronger.

     

    Sources for topical flouride include fluoridated water, fluoridated tooth paste, fluoride tablets, fluoride rinses and gels, and professional fluoride applications at the dentist.

     

    There are only a few areas in Fresno County with fluoridated water so it is important to consult with your child's dentist to ensure that your child is getting the optimum amount of fluoride. For information on water fluoridation in Fresno city see the

    Fresno Water Quality Report.  For other cities please contact your city water department.

  • Xylitol - Reducing Cavities

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recognizes the benefits of xylitol on the oral health of infants, children, adolescents, and persons with special health care needs.

     

    The use of XYLITOL GUM by mothers (2-3 times per day) starting 3 months after delivery and until the child was 2 years old, has proven to reduce cavities up to 70% by the time the child was 5 years old.

     

    Studies using Xylitol as either a sugar substitute or a small dietary addition have demonstrated a dramatic reduction in new tooth decay, along with some reversal of existing dental caries. Xylitol provides additional protection that enhances all existing prevention methods. This Xylitol effect is long-lasting and possibly permanent. Low decay rates persist even years after the trials have been completed.

     

    Studies suggest that to consistently produce positive results,  Xylitol intake must be between 4-10 grams per day divided into 3-7 consumption periods. Higher quantities did not result in greater reduction of cavities and may lead to diminishing results.  Similarly, consumption frequency of less than 3 times per day showed no effect.

     

    To find gum or other products containing Xylitol, try visiting your local health food store or search the Internet to find products containing 100% Xylitol.

  • Mouth Guards

    When a child begins to participate in recreational activities and organized sports, injuries can occur. A properly fitted mouth guard, or mouth protector, is an important piece of athletic gear that can help protect your child’s smile, and should be used during any activity that could result in a blow to the face or mouth.

     

    Mouth guards help prevent broken teeth, and injuries to the lips, tongue, face or jaw. A properly fitted mouth guard will stay in place while your child is wearing it, making it easy for them to talk and breathe.

     

    Ask our Doctors about custom and store-bought mouth protectors.